.DallasArtsRevue.com
Dallas' Oldest Art Magazine, Promoting Dallas Artists Since 1979

Home  Index   Opportunities   ThEdblog   Resources   Feedback   Reviews   Google this Site
Art by Members   How to Join   Send Us Stuff   Artists with Websites   Visual Art Groups   Contact Us

The Art Here Lately Index and The Latest Art Here Lately page

Every artwork on this site is copyright 2010 or before by the originating artist. No reproduction or approximation of these works may be created in any medium for any commercial or nonprofit use without specific written permission from the originating artist.

Art Here Lately #8

Stories + Photographs by J R Compton
x

Henderson Art Project   installed March 20

Laura Abrams - Super Magnolia - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Laura Walters Abrams   Sugar Magnolia   1828 Henderson Avenue
 

After a friend excitedly told us about the Henderson Art Project (HAP), I thought I should photograph the sculpture that dots nearly the full length of Henderson Avenue, from Ross Avenue to Central Expressway. I used to live near there and have long considered Henderson to be one of the ugliest streets in Dallas, dotted, as was and is still, with a mishmash of middle-size and small stores of so many sorts, with and without decor and lots of trashy houses in between — although some of it has lately become gentrified. It's a nearly taste-free zone that looks and feels like a zoning free zone.

It has long needed something to take attention off all that ugliness. I wasn't sure art could do it, but if anything could, that might. I drove over there, watched the sidelines very carefully and found all the major contenders in HAP's public voting contest — and then one.  

The day was deeply overcast. Later, it snowed. I knew that kind of low-contrast light would be near perfect for photographing colorful three dimensional objects, although it was so cold my fingers sometimes didn't work. Camera didn't seem to mind, but I did, although I couldn't pass up that amazing quality of light where color jumps out and grab ya — and the opportunity to juxtapose art with the clutter of real life down an ugly, cross-cultural and cross economical status street.
 

k

Andrea Reich Fender   Heaven's Door   1800 Henderson
 

First sculpture I came across was this red "door" in a grocery store parking lot very close to Ross Avenue. Compared to everything else art I saw today, it looked flimsy and insubstantial. Closed, it might not even qualify as very far into the third dimension. Not an outdoor piece by most stretches of imagination.

In big, bold, blue capital letters on the back it says, "I am the door," just in case you missed the other visual hints, although it obviously does not allow passage through it with that ugly painting of clouds in the way.

I AM the DOOR - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Andrea Reich Fender   Heaven's Door
 

This is the most vulnerable setting for a piece in this street-long showing. The object itself looks flimsy, and I worry it might get backed — or fronted into — unprotected in that parking lot. Later, using the HAP site to keep my identifications honest, I am noticing that the image for this door there in two-dimensional space is different from the object itself in 3-D space.

Used as a ballot for public voting, it's definitely non-representative of the actual piece. The site shot shows a photograph of clouds. This is a much less realistic painting, and for that matter, a much less realistic door. I wonder if I could even get through such a skinny aperture, if the cloud painting weren't blocking the way to wherever.
 

Laura Abrams - Sugar Magnolia CU - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Laura Walters Abrams   Sugar Magnolia   (detail)
   

The second piece I found was by Laura Abrams, one of my favorite 3-D artists in Dallas. I've photographed her work many times, and it's always a challenge that's always rewarding. It, too, was in a less-than-wonderful place to park a sculpture, next to an adequate place to park a car, but her big magnolia was much more interesting than the cars just a few feet away.

Even in that day's low-key lighting her brilliant, pure white is difficult to look at. Once my eyes got used to it, the cars and clutter and ugly real estate all around quietly disappeared, and I was left alone with the essence of Magnolia. Couldn't quite smell it, though.

 

 Chris Lattanzio - The Yellow Rose - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Chris Lattanzio  The Yellow Rose   2026 Henderson
 

Traveling west toward Central Expressway, this was the next piece I spied along the side of that busy street. I know this guy's work, too. He's a Supporting Member of DallasArtsRevue, and if you click the link above you'll see more of his oddly linear, yet three-dimensional drawings we'd have to call sculpture.

This is another site crammed right up against a small parking lot. I chose to shoot it looking out at the street — I waited a minute or so for no cars — and shops across the street instead of through it at a large black pickup truck, even though I had to lean back onto that truck to get the whole piece in the picture.
 

Red Beams - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

by Trent
 

This piece apparently is not in the official People's Choice Vote for best pieces (you can vote for up to three pieces) in the HAP project. It may have been there awhile. signed 'TRENT 08," I think it's by HAP-organizer Scott Trent. It was straight-forward abstract, dynamic and of course, adjacent to a parking lot, perhaps the largest and busiest lot of the bunch. Nice piece, simple, of I-beams, not terribly larger than a tall human and eminently visible from the street in blazing outdoor sculpture red.

Still, it's here, it's sculpture and it needed me photographing it, and I needed the practice. I think I got it pretty good. I didn't plan ahead for the bus, but when I saw it, I knew it was right for Henderson Avenue.
 

George Tobolowsky - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

George Tobolowsky   Outside the Circle  -  back view
 

This is the best piece I've seen by George Tobolowsky, who's got a lot of publicity out of this showing. I also shot it from in front, but I like this shot better — especially because we can see Michelle O'Michael's red and yellow piece across the street through it and in colorful contrast to these dark, extruded shapes.
 

George Tobolowsky - Outside the Circle

George Tobolowsky   Outside the Circle  -  front detail
 

Interesting that the best two pieces on the street are black (this one) and white (Laura Abrams'). His blatant. Hers subtle in some ways, both involving circles and protrusions from the centers. Hers delicate. His bold. His seems to occupy a more photogenic site. A short brick wall, the start of some bushes behind it. Hers is parked in a small grassy area just in front of a parking lot line of cars, bright metal competing for our vision with bright metal.
 

Mi

Michelle O'Michael   Prairie Fire   2430 Henderson
 

This red is bright and different enough from the building that could have engulfed the piece, but the yellow is perhaps too subtle to be seen from the street, and together, I missed them entirely. I saw Tobolowsky's black piece while I was driving and intently looking, but I only spied this one once I'd begun photographing the bolder black one.

This view shows the strut that, though necessary to hold that long, winding swoop of transitional yellows and reds, is mostly useless to the piece's aesthetics. It arcs a little but, except from this view, is nearly invisible. Sculpture, by its form, is supposed to be viewable from any side, although most of these pieces are abutted against either buildings or parking lots, making 360-degree viewing unlikely.
 

Red Dancer Dancing in the Window - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Eric Ober   Red Dancer   in the window    2729 Henderson
 

Another bright red sculpture, Eric Obers' Red Dancer only really dances reflected in the dual layers of curved glass in the front window of the store behind it. When I moved my body or my eyes, the reflected piece rewarded multiple wiggling, making this perhaps the most interesting site for a sculpture in the whole long show.
 

Eric Ober - Red Dancer

Eric Ober   Red Dancer   2729 Henderson

I like this one best close up and looking down the street in the other direction (below), but Ober's piece is lovely, full of round and rounded red shapes, and parked on the far edge of the parking lot right next to the curb, is simple, elegant and highly visible.

Red Dancer Twist - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Eric Ober   Red Dancer   2729 Henderson
 

But this is my favorite shot of it — a little knot of red winding steel in the big middle of a slow, curving sculptured dancer spinning on a busy street.
 

Stephen Lapthisophon - Bench with simulated real color - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Stephen Lapthisophon   bench   2740 Henderson   Audio Installation
 

Nice enough bench, I thought as I circled it taking photos — nice color (here recreated, because my new camera entirely missed its reds and caught only blue). But still, nice enough purple bench, but so what?

Reading the quick run-down of each piece, I noticed that the bench, which I did not take the time to sit on or thought it was art so maybe I shouldn't have, is an "Audio Installation." I had my own audio going with mp3s of cajun music blasting in my brain, so if there was anything more subtle than an 18-wheeler blasting down the street blowing its air horn, I would have missed it. I did not sit on it, perhaps tripping its mechanism to soothe me with gentle — what?

Ugly as that street is, I still find myself on it sometimes, and after the weather warms, I hope to stop there, sit and listen to whatever happens when I do.
 

Juanluis Gonzalez - Opus 1 - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Juanluis Gonzalez   Opus 1   5100 Henderson at Central Expressway
 

This is the most traditional modern sculpture on the tour, and probably getting the most attention, since it occupies a garden area in front of another parking lot, within yards of Central Expressway, so a lot of people pass it every day, though many of those are probably too busy navigating turns and being careful of traffic and traffic lights to see it. Those who do see this, probably register as I did. Oh, modern art.

It is post-modern of course. We all are, but it's the most classic dark chunk of the bunch. Well proportioned and all that, but the one least interesting to this long-time admirer of three-dimensional art. I quickly tired of looking at its contrasting shapes and thin and thick arcs. And, except that by reaching up with my camera I was able to center the circle holding these two metal clunks together on the ball painted on the front of the store behind this garden-ish area this thing is planted on, it was of no interest to me.
 

Circled Ball - Juanluis Gonzalez - Opus 1 - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Juanluis Gonzalez   Opus 1   5100 Henderson at Central Expressway
 

Other than that, this shot has no redeeming social value except to show how dreadful it looks from the street with a parking lot full of bright and bright-colored more contemporary shapes in metal and glass.

 

7th Annual Hecho en Dallas   Latino Culture Center   through April 24

Story + Photographs by J R Compton

Jack Brockette - Through a  Glass Darkly

Jack Brockette   Through a Glass Darkly   2008   fiber


Oddly unbalanced exhibition that, given its traditional smaller size and just-so placement, stuck off in the back gallery, would be outstanding, and the stuff back there nearly all is. But looks like the jurors' selections expanded well beyond the top quality work submitted — to fill both the large boring front space and the angular contemporary, up, down, wrap-around spaces in the Skylight gallery back of the Latino Culture Center.

It seems who hung the show hung two, maybe and a half. One up front that's only minimally interesting in a minimally interesting space more useful for dance or a class or crafts run wild with little kids, with a couple nice pieces lost in the miasmas. Surrounded by drek and jetsam.

Then a lovely spread of fine art in the back room with art I loved and art I didn't love, but there an attitude of fine art prevailed. The half or less fractions are the pieces scattered in between the disparate spaces, lost in nowhere land.

Jack Brockette's lush fabric Through a Glass Darkly hung free, rustling slightly in what little breeze finds its way into the back room, illuminated only by afternoon light beaming in windows and down the bright clerestory, a gentle layering of sheer and gridded squares and rectangles, delicate in alternating columns of silvers and golden browns.

I had to touch, so touched with fingers and eyes. Beautiful work in a medium too seldom seen in these competitive community exhibitions.
 

Jeff Parrott - Into the Night - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Jeff Parrott   Into the Night   2009   acrylic
 

Work in the large, front gallery, where often when H O in Dallas  shows, there's an educational show with work by four-year-olds or something, it almost seems that there still was, though a spare few that nobody figured out quite what to do with sparkled.

Either jurors were told to fill every space in the building or they didn't know where to stop and just did, and there's plenty of filler out there in the big front space I very nearly just walked past to go out the front door, not realizing till almost too late this show was bigger.

Almost wish I had just walked on by, but I might have missed Jeff Parrott's Into the Night acrylic, suffering though it was from splotchily indifferent lighting that makes it a challenge to photograph, that while I was not totally enamored of it, startled and surprised me enough for second and third takes into its densely colorful comic sensibility desperate to fill every square inch.
 

Michael Mahler - Ondeo

Michael Mahler   Ondeo   2010   acrylic on canvas
 

Or Michael Mahler's set of acrylics on canvas that looked at first and kept on looking like intricate tile wave abstracts tsunaming toward another ancient shore, full of depth and shape and perfect color.

Chris McHenry's photo realist downtown scene, sidewalk level up into the riot of buildings along Commerce Street, 2009 oil on linen catching an indelible corner of bright blue sunlight while mostly illuminated with brown tungsten gallery spots, permanently screwing my photo of it. It looked good, but maybe a tad too photographic.

I always admire painters who paint Dallas. His foreshortened line-up of massive stonework facades down one side of Commerce are amazing, florid stand-outs against acres of planar brick across the busy street, and I've done with such gems there are in the front room.
 

John David Tisdale - Buckle

John David Tisdale   Buckle 08   2009   sterling silver, copper, brass
 

A pair of belt buckles just inside the back gallery, neatly inconspicuous, horizontal on a riser, shining metals in subtle inlaid shapes, florid in low light, yet lush and abstract, looking entirely unlike belt-buckles encased in soft black shadowlessness. Another stunning little example of art in the unexpected form of craft.
 

Jesus Moroles at LCC

Probably a Jesus Moroles in the LCC Courtyard

Any time I'm in LCC with daylight streaming in, I am enraptured by the strong shadows and vivid Mesoamerican colors and shapes in the patios just outside large glass windows and doors off exhibition spaces. It becomes part of whatever show is interior. That stuff may all be fake adobe, but it colors the landscape like Santa Fe, and the sun and sky oblige that little fakery of Southwestern light with metal striped shadows and broad pure hues.

Daniel Rivera - Reliquary for Memories - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Daniel Rivera   Reliquary for Memories   2009   wood, bone and porcupine quills
 

Looking down on Daniel Rivera's Reliquary for Memories to get a decent shot of it cluding out the brilliant daylight blaring in the adjacent window, really captured the little happenstance sculpture's not-quite-random pick-up of sticks form I had to wonder if anybody had messed with since the artist put them there. Intricate, criss-crossy, busy simple contrasting striped lines and dark receiving bowl shaped valley. Oh, gosh do you suppse they're glued on?

James Michael STarr - Going to Heaven - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

James Michael Starr   Going to Heaven   2009   collage on found object
 

Another rapture with bodies suspended, not looking all that rapturous, put me more in mind of one of Dante's falling circles of hell, the colors right for that. More like bodies falling than floating into ecstasy, despite the title. More alarmist than joy. Somehow a little discontinuous Blake thrown in for measure. Too much joy missing in this melange to take its ocean baptismal and fishers serious, but I still like looking at its multiple, minute tragedies, not at all smoothed together in classic collage.
 

HumbertoDeGarrio and Kim Cadmus Owens - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Humberto DeGarrio   Sentry   2009   forged iron
and two charcoal on paper drawings by Kim Cadmus Owens
 

Couldn't adequately photograph Kim Cadmus Owens' dark, lush new charcoal drawings of Alamo Plaza Courts up close, the left of two large drawings flanking this crowned obelisk, both luscious and highly reflectant behind glass, but I got them mostly flection-free behind this ultimate balance, old-school simple Humberto DeGarrio sculpture, stark against the business of shapes on walls, flawed only by the i.d sticker stuck to the floor. Otherwise woulda been a hunt to find it in that big meandering space.

Rita Barnard - Spoon-fed Lies

Rita Barnard   Spoon-fed Lies   2008   mixed media
 

Another convoluted political piece from Rita Barnard, rich in rust and copper, metal on metal tied with metal. Hardly even have to read the too-many tags to enjoy this involved sculpture of rounds and rectangles. I couldn't there in the dark back gallery, but probably could now string its meanings back together in my photos, but think maybe if she intended them all to be read, she'd have made them legible. I feel anger and protest in it, but it's lost in unknown symbols and all-cap demands I don't want to mess with. Intricate and of a lushness many pieces back there share.

Oh. It's a beehive. I thought those were flies and some sort of honey pot...

Denton artist Cat Snapp's Saints, Heroes & Understanding lithographed and silkscreened print nearby shared tones, colors and an intricacy of symbols and proscenium shapes while being altogether different, flat, framed and behind fully reflecting glass, me in there among bright white mats and frames, all dark and beautiful in rectangular glory, or I'd show it to you. Nice.

A friend had reported nothing much worth seeing here, so I knew there'd be wonder, then was startled at the many bests in this large show's back room, and of course dismayed at all the boring losers, lined up out front.
 

Adriana Martinez Mendoza - Celebracion en blanco

ADriana Martinez Mendoza   Celebración en blanco   2008   paper/cardboard
 

This second-last piece I'll mention, a fall of clumped white tissues hanging from the ceiling, kept stealing my attention from whatever else in that lush back room, and I tried several times to capture it, into a doorway of sunlight and other distractions, would have laid on the floor photographing up but wasn't sure I could get me back up, so I just held my hands down, angled the camera up and clicked. Hard to tell what it is or why, but knowing that it is and about "celebration in white" seems right.

Bernardo Cantu - The Zapotlicos Machine

Bernardo Cantu   The Zapotlicos Machine   2010   mixed media

Bernardo Cantu's heavy-metal copper dominated texture clash machine, odd in every possible way, except it's just right, perfect in balance, hue and vividity. Zapotlicos were the polytheistic pre-Columbian Zapotec people, who believed themselves coming from the clouds, historically occupying the isthmus of Tehuantepec south of Oaxaca.

Another double- and triple-take worthy piece that defies its own parts to a whole never imagined and difficult to accept, beautious as it was. A startlement of harmony and texture, probably missing its mate, strung in extreme leotard colors and shapes out in one of the discontinous hallways. This eliciting a quiet, awestruck wow.

 

Sarah Williams   Outskirts   500X    through March 28

Sarah Williams - Cameron

Sarah Williams   Cameron   2010   oil on board   18 x 30 inches
 

Thoroughly impressed by Sarah Williams glowing Outskirts at 500X by way of Marty Walker Gallery. I forget everything else there that night except a cardboard bicycle chain spelling gang, yuk-yuk, but these knocked us out. This small they might almost look like actual photographs, and I suspect there were those in their heritage, but haunting nice.
 

Sarah Williams - Laplata

Sarah Williams  Constellations   2009   oil on board   18 x 18 inches
 

Usually out from the dark dimensional with detailed niceties. Soft subtleties of dark and light. Dare I use the C word (chiaroscuro). Lovely. Probably shouldn't say it, but reminded me of Kim Cadmus Owens, and that's a compliment. I'd just been shooting night scenes downtown and around, but nothing like this fine collection. Odd to see it at 500, but there it was.
 

Depravities of War   BTAGFOoT artists    through April 10   2010

ab

Sandow Birk   Humiliation   2007   woodcut print on sekishu paper
 

Abu Ghraib comes to Dallas: Much less impressed by the show by New York and California artists at The MAC that same night. Their director actually had the temerity to tell me she couldn't find any more Dallas artists to show. Besides, I'm sure traveling shows are much cheaper till they can tag another Dallas commercial gallery to show one of theirs there. Pity. Strong Goya-esque work, though.

When we started DARE, (the nonprofit status The MAC still uses) we had something else in mind. Very specifically to not show Big Time Art Guys from out of Town there. For awhile there, I thought maybe we had one community Dallas art center left.
 

Corazon Ten

Roy Cirigliana -

Roy J. Cirigliana   Corazon de Chimayo   digital infrared photograph with forged steel easel
 

Didn't visit this year's Corazon show till way late in its run. Had planned not to attend, but we were outside the Bath House and oh, hell, why not. Reason I hadn't is because I almost always do, and it'd be nice sometimes to do some other show instead. So I probably won't say much this time. Except this is so strange, it needs something writ about it.

I see a heart and reliquary of what I suppose drops drops of petrified blood. The crown or chain of thorns or barbed-wire seems fairly obvious. Love hurts. The rest must be feathers as in an angel's wings. Not sure about the curlicue cabriolet strips — film? Liked that part better when I didn't know what it was. But overall, I could dance to it.

Rebecca Reagan Boatman - Final Judgment - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Rebecca Reagan Boatman   Final Judgment   stoneware with mixed media
 

The end of the world as we know it. Boatman's figures keep changing, which is always a bonus in the progression of someone's work. Not sure about the balance and what's being balanced, but the beam' little similar shaped torso and head's a nice touch. I keep seeing this yellow and wondering if the Bath House will ever repaint that back room.
 

Kate Schatz - Conflicted

Kate Schatz   Conflicted   wood, cedar, metal
 

Outstanding frame, that same goofy wall paint this piece could really do without, heart physics pulling two halves together or apart. Nice to see a frame for something besides framing. Delicious wood flavors.

top

Modern Ruin   February 20-22   2010

Modern Ruin - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Modern Ruin next to Top Dollar Pawn on Greenville Ave. Now you see it; soon you won't.
 

Modern Ruin with work by Frances Bagley, Tim Best, Michael Corris, Thomas Feulmer, Annette Lawrence, M, Margaret Meehan, Tom Orr, Richard Patterson, Cam Schoepp, Noah Simblist, Christoph Trendel, Terri Thornton, Kevin Todora and Jeff Zilm lasted two and a half days, February 20, 21 and 22, 2010
 

Push Comes to Shove - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

above: Annette Lawrence   Legacy Line: Modern Ruin  2010   graphite and China marker starting
at the front door (above right) moving clockwise around the interior space
below: Terri Thornton   push comes to shove   vinyl letters on door handles as you exit   February 2010
 

The mob scene opening flushed hundreds of gallery-goers through the repurposed space in a short few hours. Policemen directed traffic around the drive-through branch office and to the nearby parking lot. Temporarily handicapped with a broken foot, we parked immediately on-site and I wheelchaired through the event / show / happening photographing with my pocket camera.
 

We Gave Them - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Entrance
 

I was not able to go back and watch the art dismantled, and I was in some awe that it was done at all, though the public portion was gala and rejoicful. It made sense in several layers but through it all ran a deep vein of skepticism and fun.
 

Cam Shoepp Drip Pail - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Cameron Schoepp   Fountain   February 2010   (detail)  
water, plastic sheeting, metal buckets, ambient sound, recorded sound throughout the space
 

That was the art of it. Temporary as it was. The building had been erected to be a Washington Mutual branch bank, but WAMU, like so many others so far in this recession and so many more that will follow, went under before this space could be used for its intended purpose.
 

Three Tall Guys - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

I want this to be:   Tim Best   Deserves got nothing to do with it  2010   inkjet prints
But it might be:  Jeff Zilm   Untitled  2010   inkjet prints
One of the mouth cards says "Alex Hay in 1966 is a motherfucker. Buy it."
 

That art was the only purpose the one-million-dollar branch office ever had — except as a blip in the upward plans of a downward diving corporation seems fair. At least some good use was made of it, and like most of us, art is only temporary at best. That it was used for two and a half days seems, if not appropriate, at least appropriated.
 

pump - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

this could be:   Christoph Trendel   Untitled (Psychohygiene)  2010   electric pump, hand sanitizer, tree
 

Some work were suitable. Others inscrutable. There was a map with which many spent long minutes figuring out where every thing was with and what it was. All the whiles the whys may have escaped us all. I thought I knew better than to try to tranlate the flat map to stereoscopical space, although I followed the permutations of this piece way too long.
 

Unknown Projection somewhere in there - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Unknown Projection in there somewhere; this may be the artist.
 

I was drawn by the aqua aquarium and odd machinations of pumps, plugs, wires and an ongoing slide show showing parts of plants. Someone said the pump was pumping water out of the bank. I thought of terms like afloat, underwater, sunk, branch, flowering, down the tubes, but I didn't put it all together.
 

Tom Orr - Scratch - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Tom Orr - Scratch   2010   deconstructed cabinets
 

This was the first piece I photographed. The one I knew immediately who had made. I've been in his massive studio and seen objects like these repurposed and reorganized bank cabinets, and I watched this one not move an inch for many minutes, catching it only this once without another human being between me and it. Few other works moved me — or stilled me — like this one did. I didn't need to know what it meant. It meant space, segmented, an elegant whole, so obviously sculpture, so perfect for its space. Yet subtle. You could probably trip over it.
 

Cam Schoepp - Fountain (detail)

Cameron Schoepp   Fountain   February 2010   (detail)  
water, plastic sheeting, metal buckets, ambient sound, recorded sound throughout the space
 

Cam Schoepp's Fountain put the ground floor of the former future now defunct bank under water, as it dripped from sagging plastic bags cached in the ceiling, cascading down into buckets, and splashing onto the carpeted floor in its own intricate timings, accompanied by a dripping symphony of ambient and recorded sounds. I looked up at this, one time and worried.
 

Dollar Bill - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Thomas Feulmer   The Future   2010   performance-distribution of 195 stamped dollars
 

Frances told me the drive-through in back was giving away money, but it would run out soon. I was busy photographing and not figuring out where it was coming out, while Anna went straight up to it and got this dollar bill that's since been lost.
 

WAMU Sign - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

WAMU Sign out front
 

According to the official exhibition hype, "at the height of a frenzied economic bubble, Washington Mutual began building a new 1 million dollar branch at 5030 Greenville Avenue, just south of Lovers Lane. Just after its completion, the government seized WaMu, and JPMorgan Chase decided not to occupy the building. The building was never opened, never used, and has sat as an empty shell for more than a year."
 

Studying Maps - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Studying Maps — that maybe Christina Rees in red. Might it be her cojuror behind?
 

It's not illogical to believe that a tagger got the sign, but neither is it likely that it's other than official art of the show, of the place. Hardly matters. It's not on the map, but neither are the covered-over signs on the front and sides of the building itself, neutralizing its identify as bank, advertising its temporary duty as art space. We almost drove by, but by the crowd inside I knew it was exhibition.
 

Blind Art - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Margaret Meehan   Unbearable   2010   aluminum blinds and grommets
 

More hype: "Seeking to take advantage of the space-its social and cultural connotations, its materials, and its presence as direct and immediate evidence of the current economic condition-15 artists will create work inspired by and in dialogue with the building. Some artists will alter the building's materials and corporate interior, while others will stage actions and interventions within, and still others will use the background of the space as context for their work."
 

Frances Baley's Bear - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Frances Bagley   Teller Ring (detail)   2010   mixed media
reminds me of the Idol of Baal in the Palace of Babylon
 

It was set for destruction so the space could be sold to another business. I'm sure it seemed an interesting idea to make art of commerce gone bad, and here we have it. Modern Ruin, a 2.5-day exhibition organized by Christina Rees and Thomas Feulmer.
 

Feulmer - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Thomas Feulmer   The Future   2010   Performance Distribution of 195 Stamped Dollars
 

She's in some of the pictures. I don't know him, but he's probably in there, too. Maybe driving in from outer space.
 

M - Super Powers - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

M   Super Powers   2007-2010   neon and ceiling tiles
 

As long as we spent there in wonder and wonderment, I managed to miss several pieces. Or I didn't think they were worth photographing. I'm sure some people videoed it.
 

From here this story will probably move to Art Here Lately but ya never know.
As usual here, if I've mis-identified anybody or anything, please let me know now.

More info from Public Radio

 

DallasArtFair   February 2 - 7   2010

Fairmount Window - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Fairmount Hotel Window in the Fog

Last time I was in that building it was for f.i.g's idiot Art Slam last year, which left bad enough a taste I wasn't excited about this trip until intelligent, creative artist friends told me how excited they were to see the Art Fair. Like it was something unique and wonderful. So I went.

It didn't help that I could barely walk and had to use a wheelchair, because I'd fractured my foot in a fall. Or maybe it did help. Except for friends, who wanted to know what happened, most people left me — suddenly several heads shorter than them — alone to commune and photograph the art, though the badge marking me as media probably helped, too.

So this is me — ably assisted by Anna, who'd been volunteering at EASL's table in Art in the District, a satellite show across the street from the fair in the Fairmount Hotel that was organized up by Ross-Akard Gallery's Bryan Embry and Jordon Roth and Susan Roth Romans, who invited EASL.

As always, my apologies to any artists whose work here is not in the correct colors. Many spaces, especially in the hHotel, were very poorly lighted.

NIck, Nora & Asta - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Nick, Nora and Asta?

Has to be Nick and Nora and Asta. The several of us standing there admiring it agreed. I didn't see an I.D, but who else? 30s fashion. Detective lighting. That squirrely little mustache and the Wire-haired Terror. Dark shadows behind. It's gotta be.

Shread A Book - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Shred A Book

I've been watching the trend of re-presented pages, words, covers, bindings, scraps as well as wholes and fractions of books, magazines and newspapers. As if our faith in those objects has failed and instead of being objects of honor and faith and knowledge, they have become the matter of art, usually without a trace of irony or sly wit.

This may be one of the more interesting objects in this ongoing trend, or maybe not, but I cannot imagine that it is original when so many artists are doing essentially the same. As a trend it makes sense, but I still wonder who started it and what their motives were. Maybe what art fairs are for is to spread trends.

Books may be nearing the end of their long cycle, but I'm sure the fad will continue another decade before everybody who thinks of themselves as an artist will have done at least one. I participated in a book show three decades ago, where books as objects were revered, and in none of its presentation were they destroyed.

 Brad Ford Smith - Desk Top Drawings - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Brad Ford Smith   Desk Top Drawings  #200 each

I photographed this collection of drawings on a dark wall in the hotel, mostly because I think I used to know the artist, although he was doing intricate and involved audial sculpture then. I think of this as as an example of a series. I didn't see any red dots except in the drawings.

When I worked Resolution Trust during the S&L debacle, high in the Republic National Bank building (rocket ship) downtown, I used to do Sunday Brunch at the Fairmount since a boss was buying. I later photographed Mel Torme and other jazz greats in the club downstairs for Texas Jazz, but I hadn't been inside for decades. I was especially taken with their spider web windows in the afternoon's foggy rain.

Quad Unicycle - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Unicycle Quint

Another not exactly original idea. I remember similarly absurd cyclew in Downtown, Deep Elm and Haute Cliffe Art Parades, presented by real estate promoters . This was oddly informal, details lost in the over-busy carpets. Not a wonderful place to see or show art, but at least there by the big web window, there was light.

Batman and Robin - copyright Anna Palmer

A phase change and the Fairmount became the Dallas Art Fair began in my photos. That's a Billy Hassell woodpecker in the enclosed space far left. Bat Man and Robin on the right.

Sam Hernandez = Thoner Strut

Sam Hernandez   Thoner Strut   3009
Madrone, Thornet Chairs, Ebony  
85 x 30 x 30 inches   $19,500

Shot this primarily because it reminded me richly of Dallas sculptor Sherry Owens' pegged wood sculptures. I like the soaring arcs here, though I'm not at all sure what the butcher-board undercarriage is holding up or down. I was very careful at the 30th Anniversary DallasArtsRevue Member Show never to place I.D tags on any sculpture, because it's considered crass and ignorant.

Painted Votive Stone - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Painted Votive Stone   Pre-Incas Culture   Highlands of Peru
700 - 1400 AD  slate and mineral pigments   16.5 x 11.5 x 1.25 inches
William Siegal Gallery

Perhaps because I've worked at a tribal gallery over the last six years, I've developed a taste for tribal art, and like many of those, this conversely reminds me of Picasso, Braque and those guys 'inventing Cubism' and repopularizing natural pigment.

pre-col figures - copyright 2010 Anna Palmer

Mace Head   Chavin Culture   Highlands of Peru   900-200 BC   stone   $3,800
Drinker   Colima Culture   Mexico   300 BC - 300 AD   terra-cotta  15.5 x 9 x 8 inches   $9000
Portrait   Maya Culture   Mesoamerica   800-900 AD   Sea Shell   6 x 5 inches   $14,000

Other scattered pieces of art were simply timeless.

Alison Schlunik Video - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Film by Allison Schulnik

So many contemporary videos have neither story, progression nor humor and seem vague excuses to wave a vidcam around in the pretense of art, but we were both struck and delighted by this rollicking clay-mation featuring the music of Grizzly Bear. It probably had a title but all I caught were the end credits, though I watched it all the way through twice.

Of all the art videos I've seen in recent years, it is one of only two that were entertaining. If the art world were truly being overtaken by video, wouldn't there have been more at DAF? Thankfully not, although an Ann Huey might have brightened that outlook.

Heath

Sherié Franssen   Heath   2010   oil on canvas   71 x 77 inches   $26,000

No idea which gallery this was in, but I lined my wheeled chair up dead center at this wild abstraction for several minutes. It reminded me of Renoir's Luncheon of the Boating Party at the Phillips Collection in Washington DC, where I'd already stood in a mostly empty room staring at for a several minutes, when a gallery person brought me a chair, so I could watch it for ten or fifteen more.

Didn't like this as much as I loved being in the presence of the Renoir, but I was wowed by it, and was further thrilled to find how new it was. I'm still staring at its torrid, fresh vision.

Funky-Town Art - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Art Needing an -ISM

Perhaps the best reason to attend DAF was to get a grip on pervasive trends.

I've been thinking about art like this for awhile. It needs an -ism attached, so we can write intelligently about it and all know what we're talking about. Neo Funk probably neither comes close nor is specific enough.

These things usually feature a short spectrum of muted colors, are thick with a cartoon heritage and primitivist vernacular type. There's a lot of fun being made of something — art, serious art, intellectuality. Who knows? Like most trends, I suspect each new artist who adopts it believes they are being very original.

When they were grad students at SMU, my late friend Georgia Stafford and Lisa Lacy came up with a term that gets at a lot of what's going on in this already aging art trend. They called their movement "Left Right Neo-Obsessivism." The Left Right of it serves mostly as obfuscation, so maybe Neo-Obsessivism covers it. It's certainly more of the moment for the last dozen or so years and on-target without actually hitting anything than post Muddern anything.

Since the predominant medium of paint has long since been eclipsed by mixed media, it might be silly to call any new decade's ism after the application of it, like the archaic Impressionism or Abstract Expressionism, but we do got plenty preoccupations, so why not Neo-Obsessivism?

Dalton Maroney - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Dalton Maroney

Like recognizing an old friend. I have been photographing Dalton Maroney's geometric outriggers in complimentary, contrasting, muted and unmuted colors, textures shapes for decades, though it may have been a whole one of those since I last saw his work. Nice to instantly recognize this at Bill Campbell Contemporary. Always pleasing to see artists who ignore trends and entertain their own obsessions.

Funky Cartoony

Jeff Muerlier   Congregate (Vegans)   2010
Jeff Muerlier   Congregate (USA)   2010
acrylic on canvas   12 x 12 inches each

Semi-abstract graphic art Neo Obsessivism.

James Castle - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

James Castle   untitled (cigarette book)  8 pps, n.d.
found paper, soot, string  $12,500

I visited this space, because I'd lived in Boise, Idaho when I was a kid and had nearly no memories of it. When I returned more than a dozen years ago, it seemed a boring little town with pleasant little mountains further up, but it had a university, in whose halls were drawers of multicolored dead, stuffed birds, which eventually helped ignite my interest in the immense color shape and variety of those.

Post-Primitive Neo Obsessive.

Tony Bones hangers - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Tony Bones hangers

The second one's a Tony Bones. Somebody else I hadn't seen in years, met through his best friend since they were kids, son of a friend, we attended his first opening and the friend's birthday, I think. He spoke then of usually eluding cops to put his art where it needed to be, which was not hanging on spiffy hangars along a bright white gallery wall. Although these won't land him in jail. I hope he still gets to tag spaces needing art, which is where his art belongs.

With so much commercial crap everywhere else on walls and poles and mechanical devices competing for our attentions, it was always a special joy to see something he'd put in front of his real audience on the street, a bridge or pole.

Photos Are - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Squeak Carnwath   Beginner   detail   2008
oil and alkyd on canvas over panel   70 x 70 inches

I was as drawn to what Squeak says about the medium, as I am interested in what I was told in junior high that taking someone's photo steals their soul, which I know to be true. Not that collecting souls is evil or harms the subject much, though sometimes we think so. I was much less enthused about the rest of the painting, which preserved neither.

Wayne Thibeaux - Chocolate Pieces

Wayne Thiebaud   Chocolate Pieces   2009   oil on canvas   12 x 16 inches

I'd seen an unmistakable drawing of a Thiebaud cityscape earlier in my roll through the Fair, but chose not to photograph it or a much-less-than Matisse. But I sidled up to this one and stayed close while my eyes fondled the rich brush strokes and lilting colors in this luscious little painting, awed to be in its company.

big James Surls - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Big James Surls

Former Dallas artist, sculptor, SMU professor and eloquent dreamer James Surls' style is unmistakable in light ...

xSmall James Surls - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Small James Surls

... as in dark wood sylphs' souls inter-connected with steel.

Sebastião Salgado - The Dinkas

Sebastião Salgado   The Dinkas   South Sudan   2006

One gorgeous photograph. I didn't catch the I.D, so I emailed the jpeg to Ben Breard, owner of The Afterimage, Texas' first all-photography gallery, and one of the first anywhere. He wrote back immediately, "I see you, too, visited Peter Fetterman's booth! That's an image by the famous South American documentary photographer Sebastião Salgado." I knew Ben would know, and share easily.

It was surrounded by classic Henri Cartier Bresson prints, so I wasn't sure whose this was, although it has not the simplicity of Bresson. Not so much a "decisive moment" (a phrase used to describe the quality many see in Bresson's work) as a decisive place to stand and take a photograph of so much going on in one frame, although Sebastião's timing is superb.

All those repeating pattern horns and cows, and silhouette human shapes, screened into the horizon with dust and smoke. An amazing vision I watched intently for several minutes. "It's luck that matters," Bresson told me from an YouTube video when I mistakenly tried to track this image from him, "You have to be receptive, that's all."

Special thanks to Jeanne Sturdevant for full caption information for the Sebastião Salgado photo and for finding the incongruities in what I had captioned the photo below with.

Deborah Ballard - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Philip John Evett   Eccentric Clock   2009   maple   16 x 18.5 inches

I was struck by this small sculpture, then I was un struck, then struck again. I've gone back and forth about it a dozen times since. I am not always that appreciative, but anything that spins me like this is worth coming back to for re-reconsideration. Then I found out its title, and it seemed appropriate.

Somewhere in the middle of my vacillation, this reminded me of Sam Rykles' much larger sculpture I put on the cover of Dallas Arts Revue on-paper several decades ago. He called his an angel, and there is that in this well-balancing figure, also, though her wings are folded.

Gallery Pass-by Shot - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Gallery Pass-by Shot

Some booths have elegant interior designs. Some seem more like they were thrown together without thought. Some gorgeous, some ugly. Hardly matters. Great art could be in any of them, crowded together or airily separate set against gobs of negative space. Then suddenly we were finished. Seen everything needing seeing, and off to more art elsewhere.

From Across the Street - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

From Across the Street

I was so busy getting myself across the street in my wheelchair when we arrived, I didn't think about photographing it, and when we left it was really too dark.

F for Fairmount Hotel

Back at the Fairmount to devalet Anna's car.

Figures in the Lobby - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Figures in the Lobby

I was slowly rolling over all those gaudy flower rugs and remembered I'd promised myself to shoot this stand of figures in the lobby.

 

Downtown Park - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

downtown park

Riding east through downtown I saw the park The City was pouring concrete into while laying off workers and closing its community galleries "to save money."

Kiosk - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission. \

Light Kiosks on this side, and a blinking PARK sign on the other

Almost like sculpture.

 

500X - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

500X

Anna wanted to see the show at the Xs. I wouldn't have minded, but it is not wheelchair accessible, so after a brief struggle, I returned to the car and shot the side of the building. We parked, as I love to do, directly on the tracks. That used to be dangerous there — I remember hanging out that roll-up door at the bottom middle above, screaming in a party of people all screaming as a freight train crashed down those tracks, probably sometimes in the mid-80s.

the tracks - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

The Tracks on Exposition Avenue

The only place where the tracks still run is encased in concrete across Exposition Avenue. Called Exposition, for the State Fair grounds that begin at the southeast end of the street, off to the left of this view northeast. Downtown is to the right.

 

LA in Dallas  

Fusilage - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Fuselage Illuminated by Klieg Lights Outside

When we got to 161 Glass, for the Grand Opening of the New Contemp, the street was lined both sides with cars parked solid. Anna pulled me up, so I could get the wheelchair out and propel myself up the ramp, when a valet asked if we had a handicap permit. No, I said, it's just temporary. But I wasn't up to walking very far. He helped us get the chair out and directed us to park right there in the all but empty handicap parking area. Whoo hoo!

Life Jackets - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Life Jackets

We'd seen Warnings & Instructions earlier in its production — See Art Talk at the soon-to-open new Dallas Contemporary on top of Art Here Lately #7. Looking around at what that, then skeletal beginnings of Warnings & Instructions, I began to understand why Los Angeles artist James Gilbert told us during his talk about the work he was about half way through back then, that he did not like showing unfinished work.

I liked the piece better then, and would not have been able to extrapolate from those elemental beginnings, to the cutesy final piece we saw splayed across that hangar-like building on the big opening night.

What had been an intriguing mesh of concepts and the essential beginnings of shape and direction, had become a pink, glossed over execution whose purposes seemed lost in all the repetitions. The elaborate visual puns had got lost in the extravaganza of scale and the admiring art mob.

Scattered Videos - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Trying to Decipher the Message

Gilbert had explained the intricacies of his plan, how the videos would provide point and counterpoint for the supposedly crashed airplane — I never saw anything that made it look crashed, except that it was in pieces, so that part of the joke, if there was one, was lost on me. I liked the un skinned aircraft parts far better than the final versions all stretched with pink plastic so much better.

Down the Hall - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Down the Hall

The building inside the building comprising the offices, which will be lighted, heated and/or air-conditioned  and have it's own ceiling seems to stretch on forever but actually forms a very specific interior space. Hardly anyone was in there, but ever-noisy and inquisitive we wandered around in there to see what we could see.

Office Furniture - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Office Furniture

We liked the warning orange office chairs contrasting the darkly stained floors.

macquett - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Macquette

And wondered about the clunky macquette

Artist's Notes - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Artist's Notes

We were intrigued by preliminary hieroglyphic drawings that had to do with the front profiles structures of various airplane and lifeboat forms. Gilbert's interelated concepts of peril and humor seemed intelligent when we heard him talk about them, when the forms were mere skeletons, but all fleshed out on opening night, we didn't get it anymore.

xColor Scheme - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

x

Most intriguing of all were the color schemes. I believe upper left is a very preliminary yet color-coordinated drawing of one of the lifeboats before the water slides.

diagrams - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

x

And these are diagrams of the structures of the shapes.

Babysitting Nose - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Babysitting Nose

The piece — it's difficult to call something that scatters across such a gaping area "piece," although it certainly comprises pieces — was supposed to trade deeply in the irony of juxtaposition. Of the definitely not funny attitude of an airplane full of people ditching in the ocean against the concept of having a water slide [See below.] on a lifeboat.

What I found profoundly visually amusing was that parents semi-automatically tended to park their young in this nose portion where they could gather in a darkened alcove to watch looping loopy deadpan demonstrations on the video machine. Just before I finally got the exposure right on this one, there were three more children in there looking lost or forsaken.

Lifeboat - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Lifeboat

I hung out in the hangar awhile, then got hungry and could feel my blood sugar was precipitously down, so I scouted out the big cake, went through the gathered crowd like only a guy in a wheelchair could and parked myself directly in front of it in and waited. I wasn't expecting ceremony, just cake. But when it started, I was right there.

Big Smiles - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

Contemp director Joan Davidow and Board Member Beth Ewing
prepare to cut the big yellow cake.

We've caught the Contemp crew matching outfits or coordinated colors before, like green for St. Pat's. It's a them thing. Joan probably thinks its cute. Don't know why yellow this time or why Joan only wore just the hat and some wore dresses. Someone who understands Fashion better than I (most of you) could probably make some incisive remarks about it, but I agree with Joan. It's cute.

Eating the Cake - Photograph Copyright 2010 by J R Compton. All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in Any Medium Without Specific Written Permission.

The first piece of cake — NONFLAM GAS

After they'd got pieces cut, they looked a little lost, like brides and grooms sometimes do, so I suggested they feed each other. I didn't say it very loud, but someone repeated it, and then someone else. The pair seemed flummoxed, hesitated, then each ate their own half of the first, corner piece of the new space's yellow grand opening cake.

I got the fourth piece. It was light, moist, sweet and yellow.
 

 


See the continuing
ThEdblog for oddly illustrated notes on my progress through this website and the rest of my life.
 

Continued on Art Here Lately #9

All Contents of this site are Copyright 2009 or before by publisher J R Compton.
All Rights Reserved. No Reproduction in any medium without specific written permission.

 

 cumulative index count

 #8